Duality of Material and Social Lives: a Study of Transformation Practices of Consumers' Goods and Finances

This research looks at how material and social lives exist in duality. Material life consists of both the world of goods and the world of finances. Under the structural duality framework, consumers are conceptualized to conduct transformation practices to navigate between material and social lives. The transformation practices include possession acquisition (both for self and others), delaying gratification, transformative experiences, resource allocation, community work, and legacy giving. During transformation, consumers attempt to obtain the right blend of resources that are required of them at their current or desired positions in the social structures, and hence achieve three different levels of structural outcomes in social life.



Citation:

Ada Leung (2006) ,"Duality of Material and Social Lives: a Study of Transformation Practices of Consumers' Goods and Finances", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Margaret Craig Lees, Teresa Davis, and Gary Gregory, Sydney, Australia : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 103-104.

Authors

Ada Leung, University of Nebraska at Kearney, USA



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2006



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