Understanding Adolescent Beliefs and Intention to Smoke: the Effect of Antismoking Information

The paper considers the effect of antismoking school presentations on adolescent beliefs and intention to smoke. Using the theory of reasoned action as the theoretical basis, the objective is to explore linkages between prior beliefs about smoking and future intention to smoke. In particular, the research explores how antismoking interventions, which explore short-term issues such as unpleasant smelling clothes and bad breath and long-term issues such as the impact on health, affect beliefs about smoking, which then impact upon smoking intentions. The analysis shows the efficacy of certain anti-smoking messages upon beliefs and behavioral intentions in the 12 to 14 year old age group. The implications for the design of antismoking communications targeting adolescents are considered.



Citation:

Nina Michaelidou, Haider Ali, and Sally Dibb (2006) ,"Understanding Adolescent Beliefs and Intention to Smoke: the Effect of Antismoking Information", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Margaret Craig Lees, Teresa Davis, and Gary Gregory, Sydney, Australia : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 290-291.

Authors

Nina Michaelidou, University of Birmingham UK
Haider Ali, Open University UK
Sally Dibb, Open University UK



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2006



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