Approach-Avoidance Conflicts in Consumer Behavior: Towards a Conceptual Framework

Approach-avoidance conflicts have attracted significant attention in psychology but rather less in consumer behavior research, apart from the environmental issues associated with retail settings. Our aim was to identify the key features of the products (as well as the influential characteristics of the retail situations) which led consumers to identify their experiences as uncomfortable, and which thus stimulated ‘approach-avoidance’ conflicts. Our starting point was a small-scale empirical study, using stories to elicit consumers’ experiences of approach-avoidance behaviors. We also investigated the different ways which consumers reacted when faced with approach-avoidance. From here we conceptualized the main components of approach-avoidance conflicts.



Citation:

Margaret K. Hogg and Elfriede Penz (2006) ,"Approach-Avoidance Conflicts in Consumer Behavior: Towards a Conceptual Framework", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Margaret Craig Lees, Teresa Davis, and Gary Gregory, Sydney, Australia : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 5-6.

Authors

Margaret K. Hogg, Lancaster University, Management School, UK
Elfriede Penz, Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration, Austria



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2006



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