Consumers’ Search Behavior For Gm Food Information

A computer-based experiment assessed voluntary search for information by a sample of consumers for a food product with new characteristics of environmental or health benefits. The research was designed on the basis of theory on benefits and costs of search. Slightly less than 50 percent of respondents sought information on topics related to genetically modified (GM) foods made available through hyperlinks. Gender, employment status, rural or urban residency, and the number of children in the household were found to be related to the probability that respondents would access information on particular topics. Age, education, income, and residence of province were not significant explainers of information search.



Citation:

Michele Veeman, Ge Gao, and Wiktor Adamosicz (2006) ,"Consumers’ Search Behavior For Gm Food Information", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Margaret Craig Lees, Teresa Davis, and Gary Gregory, Sydney, Australia : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Michele Veeman, Dept. of Rural Economy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Ge Gao, Dept. of Rural Economy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
Wiktor Adamosicz, Dept. of Rural Economy, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2006



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