Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Food: the Role of Price

Adoption of genetically modified (GM) food products in many countries have been slow because GM crops are seen to benefit large multinational corporations and farmers, and typically have no identifiable consumer benefits. To test whether clearly defined consumer benefits would change consumer perceptions, a purchasing experiment was conducted in New Zealand, a country where the GM issue has been highly controversial. The underlying concepts under study concern price, information labeling and cue effects on choice. Cherries labeled as GM, organic or conventional were on sale in a roadside stall. Approximately 30% of consumers chose to purchase GM cherries when there was a defined consumer benefit – either lower price or spray-free.



Citation:

John Knight, Damien Mather, and David Holdsworth (2006) ,"Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Food: the Role of Price", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Margaret Craig Lees, Teresa Davis, and Gary Gregory, Sydney, Australia : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 284-284.

Authors

John Knight, School of Business, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
Damien Mather, School of Business, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
David Holdsworth, School of Business, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2006



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