Do Experts Feel Differently Than Novices? a Re-Examination and Extension of the Duality Hypothesis

Previous research on expertise has predominantly focused on differences of cognitive constructs such as information processing and decision making. This study adds to previous research by investigating the dimensionality of emotions experts and novices experience in the postpurchase period. Based on factor analysis and Multidimensional Random Coefficient Multinomial Logit modeling, the results suggest that the tendency to experience positive and negative emotions simultaneously is significantly higher for novices than for experts. The results are contrasted with earlier findings on the duality hypothesis, and the implications and limitations of the study are discussed.



Citation:

Reto Felix (2006) ,"Do Experts Feel Differently Than Novices? a Re-Examination and Extension of the Duality Hypothesis", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Margaret Craig Lees, Teresa Davis, and Gary Gregory, Sydney, Australia : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 352-358.

Authors

Reto Felix, University of Monterrey, Mexico



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2006



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