Decision Waves: How 'Multi' Is Multi-Phased Decision Making?

Developing representative consumer decision models has eluded marketing modellers, making choice prediction problematic. Single and two-phase decisions are empirically supported with three-phases mooted. Further empirical research, beyond two phases, has been hindered by a lack of clarity of decision phase boundaries. This paper presents a methodology to capture decision phase boundaries and reports initial empirical results revealing that current consumer decision models exclude almost half (49%) of consumer decision processes. We propose a new ‘decision waves’ model of consumer decision-making that is inclusive of multiple decision phases.



Citation:

Wei Shao, Ashley Lye, and Sharyn Rundle-Thiele (2006) ,"Decision Waves: How 'Multi' Is Multi-Phased Decision Making?", in AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7, eds. Margaret Craig Lees, Teresa Davis, and Gary Gregory, Sydney, Australia : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 393-395.

Authors

Wei Shao, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Australia
Ashley Lye, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Australia
Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Australia



Volume

AP - Asia-Pacific Advances in Consumer Research Volume 7 | 2006



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