Don’T Quite Super Size Me: Demand For Portion Sizes and Bundles Based on Menu Format

This research addresses the contextual effect of extremeness aversion. Using fast food and soft drinks as the case study, it demonstrates how consumers have increased their caloric intake even though their intrinsic preference for the different drink sizes has remained the same. With this understanding, we evaluate how firms could reduce caloric consumption associated with soft drinks without major restriction of product choice or increases in the average price paid by the consumers and still maintain profits. We find our approach is superior to, the much discussed and implemented in six states, soft drink tax.



Citation:

Kathryn Sharpe, Richard Staelin, and Joel Huber (2007) ,"Don’T Quite Super Size Me: Demand For Portion Sizes and Bundles Based on Menu Format", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 647-700.

Authors

Kathryn Sharpe, Duke University
Richard Staelin, Duke University
Joel Huber, Duke University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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