Hey, What Gives? the Effects of Altruistic Versus Egoistic Charity Appeals on Donation Intentions

Past research has been equivocal regarding whether egoistic or altruistic appeals are more effective in encouraging charitable donation. Our research seeks to address the question: When do egoistic versus altruistic appeals work best? In a series of three experiments we find that the efficacy of these two types of appeals is moderated by factors that make egoistic (vs. altruistic) motives more salient: The type of donation (volunteerism vs. money), the donation setting (public vs. private), and the self-construal of the donor (independence vs. interdependence). Implications of the findings for marketers, charitable organizations, and consumers are discussed.



Citation:

John Peloza and Katherine White (2007) ,"Hey, What Gives? the Effects of Altruistic Versus Egoistic Charity Appeals on Donation Intentions", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 347-350.

Authors

John Peloza, Simon Fraser University, Canada
Katherine White, University of Calgary, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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