Mood Self Verification Relates to the Selection and Intake Frequency of Comfort Foods

ABSTRACT Does a person’s mood relate to the types of food eaten? This work suggests that the food people eat for “comfort” may have unknowingly been selected to verify their mood. Positive moods were robustly associated with the reported likelihood of consuming more nutritive foods while negative moods were robustly associated with the reported likelihood of consuming less nutritive foods. Weight loss strategies that generate negative moods for noncompliance may exacerbate weight problems by stimulating the overeating of less-nutritive comfort foods. Women and younger people seem particularly vulnerable to this process.



Citation:

Brian Wansink and Collin Payne (2007) ,"Mood Self Verification Relates to the Selection and Intake Frequency of Comfort Foods", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 189-190.

Authors

Brian Wansink, Cornell University
Collin Payne, Cornell University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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