The Second Wind Phenomenon: Recovery From Cognitive Fatigue With Sensory Arousal

Historically, researchers studying cognitive overload have examined the effects on decision making such as suboptimal choice and choice deferral. However, consumer recovery from overload has not been examined. In an effort to address this issue, the current study examines self-reports of overload and the methods by which consumers attempt to recover. In addition, we will investigate post-recovery cognitive performance. In an initial pretest, participants reported that overload-relief strategies involving Social Interaction and Task Distraction were most effective. Follow up experiments are planned to address  objective post-recovery performance and validate self-report findings.



Citation:

Adam Craig, Roland Leak, and Cait Poynor (2007) ,"The Second Wind Phenomenon: Recovery From Cognitive Fatigue With Sensory Arousal", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 344-345.

Authors

Adam Craig, University of South Carolina, USA
Roland Leak, University of South Carolina, USA
Cait Poynor, University of South Carolina, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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