Consuming Hyperplaces: Servicescape, Service-Escape, and the Production of the Servicespace

This study challenges the spatial and ontological conceptualizations that have been taken for granted so far in the marketing literature (e.g., the fact that a servicescape such as a shopping mall is supposed to contain and retain within its walls a shopper’s entire marketplace experience). Based on the literature on hypermodernity, utopian urbanism and existential phenomenology, a new spatial and ontological model is proposed in which the servicescape becomes only the factual, tangible part of a more projective space of consumption (the servicespace). A fieldwork confirmed that shoppers actively produce their servicespace by involving elements located outside of the physical servicescape. Consequences on the liberatory potentials in consumption, and the role of the marketplace as a place of social centrality are also discussed.



Citation:

Chris Houliez (2007) ,"Consuming Hyperplaces: Servicescape, Service-Escape, and the Production of the Servicespace", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 145.

Authors

Chris Houliez, University of Saskatchewan, Canada



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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