Children’S Conceptualizations of Sales

It is not entirely clear what children understand the phrase “on sale” to mean, and what specific implications they believe a sale has for shopping decisions. Our research examines these questions, first through a series of exploratory studies that help us to understand the different ways that children conceptualize a “sale,” and then through a series of experiments where we test the effects of various means by which “on sale” is communicated. While we find that there is generally a great deal of variation in children’s sale knowledge, and that some semantic and numeric cues used to convey an item’s sale status have the potential to create confusion for children, we also find some surprisingly sophisticated reasoning about what a sale is, why a store would have one, and what it means for consumers.



Citation:

Wendy Attaya Boland and Lance-Michael Erickson (2007) ,"Children’S Conceptualizations of Sales", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 566.

Authors

Wendy Attaya Boland, University of Arizona, USA
Lance-Michael Erickson, University of Arizona, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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