On the Consumption of Negative Feelings

How can the hedonistic assumption (i.e., people’s willingness to pursue pleasure and avoid pain) be reconciled with people choosing to expose themselves to experiences known to elicit negative feelings? We assess how (1) the intensity of the negative feelings, (2) positive feelings in the aftermath, and (3) the coactivation of positive and negative feelings contribute to our understanding of such behavior. In a series of 4 studies, consumers with either approach or avoidance tendencies (toward horror movies) were asked to report their positive and/or negative feelings either after (experiment 1) or while (experiments 2, 3A, and 3B) they were exposed to a horror movie. We demonstrate how a model incorporating coactivation principles and enriched with a protective frame moderator (via detachment) can provide a more parsimonious and viable description of the affective reactions that result from counter-hedonic behavior.



Citation:

Eduardo B. Andrade and Joel B. Cohen (2007) ,"On the Consumption of Negative Feelings", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 225-227.

Authors

Eduardo B. Andrade, University of California, Berkeley, US
Joel B. Cohen, University of Florida, US



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Ritual Scholarship in Marketing: Past, Present and Future

Cele Otnes, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Linda Tuncay Zayer, Loyola University Chicago, USA
Robert Arias, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA
Arun Sreekumar, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA

Read More

Featured

I1. Blaming Him or Them? A Study on Attribution Behavior

Chun Zhang, University of Dayton
Michel Laroche, Concordia University, Canada
Yaoqi Li, Sun Yat-Sen University, China

Read More

Featured

The Effects of Breadth of Product Categories on Budgeting

An Tran, University of La Verne
John Lynch, University of Colorado, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.