The Eye’S Mind and the Mind’S Eye: Impact of Overt Attention on Creative Thinking

Drawing upon research on creativity and visual perception, we propose that the breadth of overt attention can impact creativity on a subsequent creativity task. Specifically, we propose that a broad overt attention associated with scanning a broad visual field as opposed to a narrow overt attention associated with scanning a narrow visual field enhances the scope of covert attention (i.e., internal attention), which can be beneficially applied to a subsequent consumer creativity task. Results from our three studies support our hypothesis. Consistent with our hypothesis, scanning a broad visual field (e.g., watching a movie on a 50-inch screen) versus scanning a narrow visual field (e.g., watching a movie on a 17-inch screen) improved performance on a subsequent consumer creativity task of coming up with creative gift ideas for a friend.



Citation:

Baba Shiv and Monica Wadhwa (2007) ,"The Eye’S Mind and the Mind’S Eye: Impact of Overt Attention on Creative Thinking", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 660-662.

Authors

Baba Shiv, Stanford University
Monica Wadhwa, Stanford University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

The Secrecy Effect: Secret Consumption Polarizes Product Evaluations

Maria A Rodas, University of Minnesota, USA
Deborah Roedder John, University of Minnesota, USA

Read More

Featured

O6. Be Aware of Your Suspicion: When “Being Suspicious” Ironically Leads to Suboptimal Judgment- and Decision-Making

Julie Verstraeten, Ghent University, Belgium
Tina Tessitore, INSEEC Business School, France
Maggie Geuens, Ghent University, Belgium

Read More

Featured

A10. Opting Opt-in or Out? Effects of Defaults on Perceived Control and Valuation of Personal Data

Iris van Ooijen, University of Twente

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.