What’S Yours Is Mine: Self-Construal and Reactance on Behalf of Others

This project examines the relationship between psychological reactance, a motivational state where individuals attempt to restore restricted freedoms, and self-construal, which concerns whether individuals define themselves as autonomous from or as interconnected with others. A scenario study confirmed our predictions that independent individuals would express more reactance when their freedom to choose their favorite product was restricted than when a friend was restricted, while interdependent individuals expressed the same amount of reactance whether they or a friend were restricted. We provide initial evidence that individuals can experience reactance on behalf of others, and that this experience is moderated by self-construal.



Citation:

Sarah Moore and Gavan Fitzsimons (2007) ,"What’S Yours Is Mine: Self-Construal and Reactance on Behalf of Others", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 223-225.

Authors

Sarah Moore, Duke University, USA
Gavan Fitzsimons, Duke University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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