Counting Every Thought: Implicit Measures of Cognitive Responses to Advertising

Prior methods of measuring cognitive responses to advertisements have almost exclusively used thought-listing. Our research explores indirect measures of cognitive responses. In four experiments, we demonstrate that consumers’ thoughts during exposure to persuasive messages can be assessed by thought recognition (a direct memory) and belief verification (an indirect memory task). We also show that performance on these tasks (i.e., jointly observed responses, latencies, and confidence ratings) can be modeled as Poisson counting processes. Finally, two experiments illustrate the effectiveness of these measures in predicting consumers’ attitudes toward the advertised brands.



Citation:

Yanliu Huang and J. Wesley Hutchinson (2007) ,"Counting Every Thought: Implicit Measures of Cognitive Responses to Advertising", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 266-270.

Authors

Yanliu Huang, Univeristy of Pennsylvania, USA
J. Wesley Hutchinson, Univeristy of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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