Do the Means Justify the End? the Effect of Liking For the Decision Process on Liking For the Decision Outcome

Consumers’ evaluations of the quality of a decision outcome may depend on their liking of the decision process. The appeal of the process was manipulated through the decision goal. In the first two studies participants were or were not assigned a self-pampering goal. Because self-pampering is associated with being spoiled, participants with a pampering goal liked choosing less than those without this goal. In the third study the decision goal was to have fun or to learn. Because having fun is more enjoyable than learning, fun-participants liked choosing more than learn-participants. Outcome satisfaction mirrored participants’ liking of the decision process



Citation:

Simona Botti and Ann McGill (2007) ,"Do the Means Justify the End? the Effect of Liking For the Decision Process on Liking For the Decision Outcome", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 214-220.

Authors

Simona Botti, Cornell University, USA
Ann McGill, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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