When We Practice to Deceive: an Exploration Into the Accommodative Role of Deceptive Practices in Market Exchanges

The present understanding of marketplace deception is reflected in a stream of research primarily addressing the protection of consumers from the deceptive practices of marketers. The conceptualization that has emerged from this body of work may not sufficiently reflect the role of deceptive practices in negotiated market exchanges. Evidence from the negotiation and mediation literature is cited to support the idea that, in market exchanges involving complex, protracted negotiation, the use of deception by both buyers and sellers may serve to accommodate rather than hinder the exchange process. Based in the theoretical underpinnings of accommodative schemas, an empirical study is proposed to explore the possible accommodative role of deception in consumer market exchanges.



Citation:

David Hunt and Scott Radford (2007) ,"When We Practice to Deceive: an Exploration Into the Accommodative Role of Deceptive Practices in Market Exchanges", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 421-425.

Authors

David Hunt, University of Wyoming, USA
Scott Radford, University of Missouri, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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