Learning and Liking Through Comparison: the Influence of Multiple Analogies on New Product Interpretations and Preferences

While the use of analogy cues with their emphasis on structural relations has known to be effective in communicating the core functionality of new products, the use of a single analogy cue has its shortcomings. Specifically, in the absence of surface similarity between the new product and an analogy cue, consumers are often unable to retrieve the common functionality between the new product and the analogy cue. We use the theory of analogical encoding to show that the comparison and alignment of two analogy cues illuminates the common functionality, leading to superior knowledge transfer and greater product preference for the new product.



Citation:

Reetika Gupta and Sankar Sen (2007) ,"Learning and Liking Through Comparison: the Influence of Multiple Analogies on New Product Interpretations and Preferences", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 152-156.

Authors

Reetika Gupta, Lehigh University, USA
Sankar Sen, Baruch College/CUNY, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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