1995 Feels So Close Yet So Far: the Effect of Event “Markers” on the Subjective Feeling of Elapsed Time

Why do some events feel more distant than others? Past research has reported positive correlations between feelings of recency and event importance, vividness, and emotionality. But what about events that are equally vivid or emotional? We argue that equally vivid or emotional events can feel more or less distant in time depending upon the perceived number of subsequent events precipitated by the target events. We call these subsequent events “memory markers,” and hypothesize that events associated with a larger number of markers will elicit feelings of greater temporal distance than equally vivid events that are associated with fewer markers.



Citation:

Kristin Diehl, Jonathan Levav, and Gal Zauberman (2007) ,"1995 Feels So Close Yet So Far: the Effect of Event “Markers” on the Subjective Feeling of Elapsed Time", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 547.

Authors

Kristin Diehl, University of Southern California, USA
Jonathan Levav, Columbia University, USA
Gal Zauberman, University of North Carolina, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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