Consumer Consideration Sets: Altering Memory, Brand Evaluations, and Choice

Nedungadi (1990) suggested that only minor brands within a product category will benefit from advertising effects of competitors. We speculate that his results may have been restricted because he used a limited set of brand categories, and his hypotheses were derived from assumptions of the separate systems account of memory (Kronlund, Whittlesea and Yoon, forthcoming). Importantly, his results are not consistent with the DRM effect (Roediger & McDermott, 1995), which suggests the most benefit would accrue to major rather than minor brands. We performed a re-inquiry into the work of Nedungadi (1990).



Citation:

Antonia Kronlund and Carolyn Yoon (2007) ,"Consumer Consideration Sets: Altering Memory, Brand Evaluations, and Choice", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 407-410.

Authors

Antonia Kronlund, Department of Marketing, International Business and Strategy, Brock University, Canada
Carolyn Yoon, Department of Marketing, University of Michigan



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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