Does Silence Matter? : Effect of Time Taken to Respond on Bargaining Outcomes & Evaluations

This paper reports two studies that examine the effect of time taken by an opponent to respond to an offer on bargaining evaluations. Study 1 finds that bargaining evaluations were higher when an offer was accepted (rejected) after a delay (immediately) than when it was accepted immediately (rejected after a delay). Study 2 shows that bargaining opponent’s role moderates the influence of response time. Together the research suggests that negotiator interaction process factors that emerge from the bargaining environment, such as the time taken by an opponent to respond to an offer, are interpreted with respect to contextual factors such as bargaining opponent’s role.



Citation:

Shweta Oza and Joydeep Srivastava (2007) ,"Does Silence Matter? : Effect of Time Taken to Respond on Bargaining Outcomes & Evaluations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 573-574.

Authors

Shweta Oza, University of Maryland
Joydeep Srivastava, Univeristy of Maryland



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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