Uncertainty, Virtual Consumption, and Prolonged Happiness

People generally dislike uncertainty. However, recent research shows that uncertainty associated with positive events may actually prolong people’s happiness. The present research further suggests that whether an uncertain positive event (e.g., winning a lucky draw but not knowing the particular prize won) would lead to prolonged happiness depends on the amount of imagery thought elicited by the event. Positive moods would be sustained only when people can generate sufficient imagery thought about the various possibilities involved in the event. Results from three experiments lend support to the proposed mechanism underlying happiness prolongation following uncertain positive events.



Citation:

Cheng Qiu and Yih Hwai Lee (2007) ,"Uncertainty, Virtual Consumption, and Prolonged Happiness", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 650-749.

Authors

Cheng Qiu, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Yih Hwai Lee, National University of Singapore, Singapore



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

B8. Factors Influencing Collaborative Consumption Usage in the US market: An Exploratory Study

Pia Annette Albinsson, Appalachian State University
B. Yasanthi Perera, Brock University, Canada
Bidisha Burman, University of Mary Washington
Lubna Nafees, Appalachian State University

Read More

Featured

D11. A Hidden Cost of Advocating: Attitude Depolarization After Recommending

Ravini Savindya Abeywickrama, University of Melbourne, Australia
Gergely Nyilasy, University of Melbourne, Australia
Simon M. Laham, University of Melbourne, Australia

Read More

Featured

Placing Identity into the Self-Concept: The Role of Causal Beliefs in Identity-Based Consumption

Stephanie Chen, London Business School, UK
Oleg Urminsky, University of Chicago, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.