Ladies and Gentlemen, Lend Me Your Attitudes…:Implicit Attitude Formation As a Result of Group Membership and Consumption Stereotypes

Two experiments assess the role of implicit partisanship (a trivial connection between a consumer and a consumption group) on evaluation of products consistent with group stereotypes. Using a variant of the minimal group paradigm, Experiment 1 required participants to self-categorize with a group of fictitious others via a trivial categorization task. Subjects then learned that the group with which they self-categorized was engaged in a "scavenger hunt" to find either digital or analog clocks. This trivial self-group association prompted more positive implicit attitudes toward the clock type associated with the assigned group. Experiment 2 replicated these results using fictitious brand names instead of the non-valenced objects. Results revealed that attitudes thus formed increased purchase intentions for the brand to which the group was linked. Hence consumption stereotypes (beliefs about the appropriateness of products and brands for a particular group) may drive preference without conscious deliberation.



Citation:

Andrew Perkins, Brad Pinter, Anthony G. Greenwald, and Mark Forehand (2007) ,"Ladies and Gentlemen, Lend Me Your Attitudes…:Implicit Attitude Formation As a Result of Group Membership and Consumption Stereotypes", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 650-749.

Authors

Andrew Perkins, Rice University, USA
Brad Pinter, Penn State Altoona, USA
Anthony G. Greenwald, University of Washington, USA
Mark Forehand, University of Washington, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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