Sex-Related Cues Instigate the Urge to Splurge. How an Incidental Visceral State Renders Subsequent Behavior, Judgment and Decision-Making More Impulsive.

In three experiments we investigate whether subtle sexual cues are capable of instigating impulsive decision making. We employ a diverse set of behavioral measures to quantify the extent to which an individual acts impulsively following exposure to sexual cues. We demonstrate that exposure to pictures of sexy women or to lingerie leads to a heightened preference for smaller, immediate rewards; to difficulties in inhibiting prepotent responses; to a heightened preference for larger but riskier rewards, and to less unfavorable opinions about impulse buying. These studies demonstrate that visceral states may persist beyond the eliciting situation and affect subsequent behavior.



Citation:

Bram Van den Bergh, Siegfried Dewitte, and Luk Warlop (2007) ,"Sex-Related Cues Instigate the Urge to Splurge. How an Incidental Visceral State Renders Subsequent Behavior, Judgment and Decision-Making More Impulsive.", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 100-101.

Authors

Bram Van den Bergh, KULeuven, Belgium
Siegfried Dewitte, KULeuven, Belgium
Luk Warlop, KULeuven, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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