Planning For Which Future? Lay Theories of Self-Control and the Temporal Framing of Goal-Directed Behavior

This research examines the effects of lay theories of self-control, i.e., beliefs that self-control is a limited or unlimited resource, on the temporal framing of goals. We find that individuals who believe that self-control is inherently limited are more likely to consider goals in temporally proximal (vs. distal) contexts. Limited theorists reported greater intentions of performing goal relevant activities and were more persuaded by goal relevant information when the time frame was closer rather than distant. In contrast, unlimited theorists took a distal perspective on goals and distally framed goals were more effective in eliciting greater intentions and persuasion.



Citation:

Anirban Mukhopadhyay and Nidhi Agrawal (2007) ,"Planning For Which Future? Lay Theories of Self-Control and the Temporal Framing of Goal-Directed Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 415-416.

Authors

Anirban Mukhopadhyay, HKUST
Nidhi Agrawal, Northwestern University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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