The Moderating Role of Need For Cognition and Counterfactual Thinking on Product Evaluation

Counterfactual thinking (CFT) refers to the process of reflecting on past events and simulating alternative possible outcomes. This research reports two studies exploring CFT. Experiment 1 finds that after exposure to a purchase failure, CFT encourages high need for cognition (NFC) individuals to engage in downward CFT, resulting in more positive product evaluations. Low NFC individuals invoke upward CFT after exposure to a purchase failure, resulting in lower product evaluations. By contrast, after experiencing a satisfying purchase, respondents’ product evaluations were unaffected by their processing propensity. Experiment 2 provides an extension of experiment 1 and explores the process that underlies these effects.



Citation:

Kai-Yu Wang, Minli Liang, and Laura Peracchio (2007) ,"The Moderating Role of Need For Cognition and Counterfactual Thinking on Product Evaluation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 233-234.

Authors

Kai-Yu Wang, University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee, U.S.A.
Minli Liang, University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee, U.S.A.
Laura Peracchio, University of Wisconsin--Milwaukee, U.S.A.



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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