Segmenting and Targeting American University Students to Promote Responsible Alcohol Use: a Case For Applying Social Marketing Principles

Campaigns to promote responsible alcohol use on American university campuses lack a social marketing approach. Campaign managers do not attempt to satisfy students’ underlying need to drink, treat students as one undifferentiated group, and create homogeneous and ineffective social change campaigns. To overcome this weakness, the current study segmented freshmen and sophomores enrolled at a large mid-western university by their drinking habits. Each segment was profiled by demographic and binge drinking related Theory of Planned Behavior variables, and a strategy to promote responsible alcohol use for each segment was proposed using Rothschild’s (1999) framework of education, marketing, and law.



Citation:

Sameer Deshpande (2007) ,"Segmenting and Targeting American University Students to Promote Responsible Alcohol Use: a Case For Applying Social Marketing Principles", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 164-165.

Authors

Sameer Deshpande, University of Lethbridge



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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