Preference Exploration and Learning: the Role of Intensiveness and Extensiveness of Experience

In this research, the authors partition the construct of experience and examine the impact of two specific types of experience on preference learning. Findings from the first study demonstrate that experience affects preference learning. In the next two studies, the authors’ theory that experience can be partitioned into intensiveness (i.e., amount) and extensiveness (i.e., breadth) of experience is supported; they suggest that the latter exerts a larger influence on preference learning. In the final three studies, the authors investigate three factors that lead to the selection of novel alternatives.



Citation:

Steve Hoeffler, Dan Ariely, Pat West, and Rod Duclos (2007) ,"Preference Exploration and Learning: the Role of Intensiveness and Extensiveness of Experience", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 692-695.

Authors

Steve Hoeffler, University of North Carolina -- Chapel Hill, USA
Dan Ariely, MIT, USA
Pat West, Ohio State University, USA
Rod Duclos, University of North Carolina -- Chapel Hill, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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