Temporal Sequence Effects: a Memory Framework

While much attention has been given recently to studying temporal sequences of events, virtually no attention has been given to the underlying mechanism responsible for how people form global retrospective evaluations of temporal sequences. The findings from this research suggest that a memory-based framework can provide a parsimonious, comprehensive explanation for retrospective evaluations. In addition to accounting for past findings such as a preference for improving over declining temporal sequences and the important role of peak (both high intensity and unique) experiences, we demonstrate that imposing a delay prior to retrospective evaluations can create a preference reversal due to the reduced accessibility of final or common instances.



Citation:

Nicole Votolato Montgomery and H. Rao Unnava (2007) ,"Temporal Sequence Effects: a Memory Framework", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 743-744.

Authors

Nicole Votolato Montgomery, The Ohio State University
H. Rao Unnava, The Ohio State University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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