Does a Medium Context Have a Priming Or an Interference Effect? It Depends on How You Look At It.

Previous medium context research focused on the impact of a context on a subsequent ad. However, context and ad can also be watched in the opposite order or even simultaneously. This paper focused on the order of the ad (after, simultaneously with or before the context) and the type of the context (ad-congruent or incongruent). The results indicated a congruency effect for the context-ad sequence, but a contrast effect for the ad-context sequence. For simultaneous exposure, eye tracking revealed a decreasing congruency effect which turned into a contrast effect the more respondents switched from context to ad and vice versa.



Citation:

Wim Janssens, Patrick De Pelsmacker, and Maggie Geuens (2007) ,"Does a Medium Context Have a Priming Or an Interference Effect? It Depends on How You Look At It.", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 684-685.

Authors

Wim Janssens, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Patrick De Pelsmacker, University of Antwerp, Belgium
Maggie Geuens, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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