Consumer Experiences and Market Resistance: an Extension of Resistance Theories

In this article, we expand resistance theory via a long-term study of consumers’ expectations, experiences, and re-creations of traditions. We introduce the notion of “market resistance,” which refers to a behavioral opposition to status-quo behaviors and traditions associated with a particular market. Using multiple methods, we find links between consumer characteristics and market resistance in the context of the Valentine’s Day market. Key characteristics associated with resistance include unfulfilled expectations, exclusion, terminal materialism, obligations, role exhaustion, and low need perception. The resulting framework includes the co-existing acts of purposeful resistance and consumer creation.



Citation:

Angeline Close and George Zinkhan (2007) ,"Consumer Experiences and Market Resistance: an Extension of Resistance Theories", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 256-262.

Authors

Angeline Close, University of Nevada Las Vegas
George Zinkhan, The University of Georgia



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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