The Process By Which Brand Committed Consumers Evaluate Competitive Brands: the Case For Similarity and Dissimilarity Testing

We examine the evaluation of competitive brands by high and low commitment consumers. We propose that both high and low commitment consumers use a selective hypothesis testing mechanism. However, we predict that high commitment consumers use a dissimilarity testing process, while low commitment consumers use a similarity testing process, resulting in different outcomes for the evaluation of competitor brands. Three studies are reported that examine these predictions.



Citation:

Sekar Raju and H. Rao Unnava (2007) ,"The Process By Which Brand Committed Consumers Evaluate Competitive Brands: the Case For Similarity and Dissimilarity Testing", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 662-663.

Authors

Sekar Raju, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
H. Rao Unnava, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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