Fact, Fear, Or Regret: Getting People to Cope Actively

The present research investigates how the emotions of fear and regret as compared to a factual appeal differentially affect coping processes and behaviors. Using real time measures of coping in a series of experiments, we find theorized differences between the high responsibility emotion of regret and the low responsibility emotion of fear. When a state of responsibility is evoked through an emotional appeal (specifically a regret appeal), action oriented coping is triggered. However, when feelings of responsibility are dampened through a fear appeal, denial coping is triggered. In a factual (control) condition participants coped in accord with their individual trait coping styles.



Citation:

Kirsten Grasshof, Barbara Kahn, and Mary Frances Luce (2007) ,"Fact, Fear, Or Regret: Getting People to Cope Actively", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 532-535.

Authors

Kirsten Grasshof, Perdue School of Business, Salisbury University, USA
Barbara Kahn, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Mary Frances Luce, Fuqua School, Duke University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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