Collins’S Interaction Ritual Theory: Using Interaction Rituals to Conceptualize How Objects Become Sacred Symbols

Numerous marketing articles have been published on special possessions emphasizing the roles that objects play in constructing identity or self. While these articles emphasize the importance of special possessions, there has been a dearth of theory and understanding as to how these objects are commissioned as “special” by the consumer. Currently unbeknownst to marketers, Collins’s Interaction Ritual Theory provides a new conceptual tool by which marketers can investigate this consumer selection process. By examining consumer’s interaction rituals, marketers can gain a better understanding of the process by which objects become sacred, that is to say how material objects become special possessions symbolically representing previous positive interactions.



Citation:

Kyle A. Huggins, Jeff B. Murray, Jeremy Kees, and Elizabeth H. Creyer (2007) ,"Collins’S Interaction Ritual Theory: Using Interaction Rituals to Conceptualize How Objects Become Sacred Symbols", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 335-337.

Authors

Kyle A. Huggins, University of Arkansas - Fayetteville, USA
Jeff B. Murray, University of Arkansas - Fayetteville, USA
Jeremy Kees, University of Arkansas - Fayetteville, USA
Elizabeth H. Creyer, University of Arkansas - Fayetteville, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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