Self-Monitoring and Status Motivation: an Implicit Cognition Perspective

Prior research has highlighted the role of self-monitoring as a key individual trait impacting consumer behavior. In an extensive review, Gangestad and Snyder (2000) identified a need for research investigating the role of status motivation in self-monitoring. This research constitutes an answer to their call from an implicit cognition perspective. To do this, we rely on the motivation and opportunity as determinants of attitude-behavior processes model (MODE, Fazio and Towles-Schwen 1999). Results indicate that both low- and high self-monitors share positive automatic attitudes about status. However, low self-monitors seem to rely on these automatic associations to make explicit status judgments whereas high self-monitors do less so. These results integrate prior findings in consumer research and open up avenues for future inquiry.



Citation:

Sandor Czellar (2007) ,"Self-Monitoring and Status Motivation: an Implicit Cognition Perspective", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34, eds. Gavan Fitzsimons and Vicki Morwitz, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 332-334.

Authors

Sandor Czellar, HEC Paris, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 34 | 2007



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