“Men’S Consumption Fears and Spoiled Identity: the Role of Cultural Models of Masculinity in the Construction of Men’S Ideals.”

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to explore consumption fears among males using respondent collages to isolate consumption imagery. We introduce the concepts of fear, social identity, and stigma management as well as models of masculinity in order to explore the relationship between males consumption fears and the formation of masculine ideals. We found that consumption fears are directly related to the ideals of masculinity. Specifically we found three main themes emerging that relate to consumption fears: (1) success, (2) social competitiveness and (3) the formation of family. In each case consumption fears were tied to masculinity through the fear of spoiled identity.



Citation:

Joel Watson and Mary Helou (2006) ,"“Men’S Consumption Fears and Spoiled Identity: the Role of Cultural Models of Masculinity in the Construction of Men’S Ideals.”", in GCB - Gender and Consumer Behavior Volume 8, eds. Lorna Stevens and Janet Borgerson, Edinburgh, Scottland : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 22.

Authors

Joel Watson, Helzberg School of Management, Rockhurst University
Mary Helou, Helzberg School of Management, Rockhurst University



Volume

GCB - Gender and Consumer Behavior Volume 8 | 2006



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