Prime Beef Cuts: Culinary Images For Thinking Men

ABSTRACT

The paper discusses masculinity as a socially constructed gender (Bristor & Fischer, 1993), examining images to ‘think gender’ or ‘do gender’. Specifically, it explores the narrative content of representations of masculinity as choreographed within a series of photographic print images that seek to position the market appeal of a contemporary lifestyle cookery book. In this way we set out to render more concrete discussions of the transformative potential of images of gender relations. We consider how images of men ‘doing masculinity’ in gendered spaces are not only channeled into reproducing existing gender hierarchy and compulsory heterosexuality in the service of commercial ends, but also, simultaneously, into disrupting such enduring stereotyping through inciting subtle reframing.



Citation:

Douglas Brownlie and Paul Hewer (2006) ,"Prime Beef Cuts: Culinary Images For Thinking Men", in GCB - Gender and Consumer Behavior Volume 8, eds. Lorna Stevens and Janet Borgerson, Edinburgh, Scottland : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 13.

Authors

Douglas Brownlie, University of Stirling
Paul Hewer, University of Stirling



Volume

GCB - Gender and Consumer Behavior Volume 8 | 2006



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