Social Exclusion in a Consumer Society: Lone Mothers in the Uk Welfare State

ABSTRACT

This paper explores the experiences of lone mothers who are financially dependent on the UK welfare state. Findings suggest that prioritizing paid employment and devaluing unpaid work results in stigmatization and social exclusion from mainstream consumer society. Families face many barriers on the road to social inclusion including barriers that are created by the very government that claims to be trying to remove them. The dependency culture discourages lone mothers from finding employment but encourages turning to illicit income. It is argued that both stigmatization and turning towards illicit income are driven by the emphasis on consumption in today’s society.



Citation:

Kathy Hamilton and Miriam Catterall (2006) ,"Social Exclusion in a Consumer Society: Lone Mothers in the Uk Welfare State", in GCB - Gender and Consumer Behavior Volume 8, eds. Lorna Stevens and Janet Borgerson, Edinburgh, Scottland : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 15.

Authors

Kathy Hamilton, School of Management and Economics, Queen’s University of Belfast
Miriam Catterall, School of Management and Economics, Queen’s University of Belfast



Volume

GCB - Gender and Consumer Behavior Volume 8 | 2006



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