Shopping –Differences Between Genders Or Differences in Interests?

SHORT ABSTRACT
 

This working paper addresses differences and similarities between male and female shopping behaviour. It hypothesises that the differences in shopping behaviour between men and women are not related to biological gender, but to differences in interests, which may be related to differences in personality. It also acknowledges that this still has to be determined. For this purpose, the background literature is discussed and a preliminary study is outlined. A preliminary analysis suggests that overall men and women indeed conceptualise shopping very similarly, but at the same time there are also both men and women who stereotype themselves as a “stereotypical male or female shopper”.



Citation:

Ivonne Hoeger, Brian Young, and Jonathan Schroeder (2006) ,"Shopping –Differences Between Genders Or Differences in Interests?", in GCB - Gender and Consumer Behavior Volume 8, eds. Lorna Stevens and Janet Borgerson, Edinburgh, Scottland : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 4.

Authors

Ivonne Hoeger, University of Exeter
Brian Young, School of Psychology, University of Exeter
Jonathan Schroeder, School of Business and Economics, University of Exeter



Volume

GCB - Gender and Consumer Behavior Volume 8 | 2006



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