Explaining the Negative Spillover Effect in Target Marketing: Automatic Social Comparisons That Threaten Collective Self-Esteem

Explaining the Negative Spillover Effect in Target Marketing:

Automatic Social Comparisons that Threaten Collective Self-Esteem

 

 

Claudiu V. Dimofte

Georgetown University

 

Ronald C. Goodstein

Georgetown University

 

 

ABSTRACT

The present research proposes that previously inconsistent findings on the NSE in consumer behavior work can be explained by accounting for the unconscious impact of activated negative stereotypes among non-targeted consumers. More importantly, it appears that (for those consumers highly identified with a particular group membership) this activation occurs even when prompted by cues that are largely irrelevant to the particular stereotype in question. While this finding is troubling, a particular way to mitigate the risk of NSE by advertisers refers to their use of specific regulatory focus manipulations, such as execution variables that put consumers in a state of promotion (strategic eagerness).



Citation:

Claudiu Dimofte and Ronald Goodstein (2006) ,"Explaining the Negative Spillover Effect in Target Marketing: Automatic Social Comparisons That Threaten Collective Self-Esteem", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 276-276.

Authors

Claudiu Dimofte, Georgetown University
Ronald Goodstein, Georgetown University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



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