The Waiting Game: the Role of Predicted Value, Wait Disconfirmation, and Providers' Actions in Consumers' Service Evaluations

THE WAITING GAME: THE ROLE OF PREDICTED VALUE, WAIT DISCONFIRMATION, AND PROVIDERS’ ACTIONS IN CONSUMERS’

SERVICE EVALUATIONS

Ruoh-Nan Yan, Colorado State University

Sherry Lotz, The University of Arizona

ABSTRACT

Management of consumer waiting experiences is critical for practitioners in that unpleasant waiting experiences may result in negative service evaluations.  This paper develops a conceptual model in which predicted value of service, wait expectation (conceptualized as “consumer zone of wait tolerance” derived from the service literatures), wait disconfirmation (consumers’ comparisons between wait expectations and perceptions), and affective response to waiting are proposed to directly or indirectly affect service experience evaluation.  In addition, this study proposes that actions of the service provider moderate the relationship between affective response to waiting and service experience evaluation.  Conclusions and implications are discussed.



Citation:

RUOH-NAN YAN and SHERRY LOTZ (2006) ,"The Waiting Game: the Role of Predicted Value, Wait Disconfirmation, and Providers' Actions in Consumers' Service Evaluations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 412-418.

Authors

RUOH-NAN YAN, THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
SHERRY LOTZ, THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Brand Relationships in a "Post-Fact” World

Luciana Velloso, York University, Canada
Eileen Fischer, York University, Canada

Read More

Featured

Social Sharing of Negative Emotions in Virtual Travel Communities

Clara Koetz, Rennes School of Business
Anke Piepenbrink, Rennes School of Business

Read More

Featured

Exploring the Intersection of Digital Virtual Consumption and Family Rituals

Linda Tuncay Zayer, Loyola University Chicago, USA
Jenna Drenten, Loyola University Chicago, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.