Brand Stereotypes and Consumer Judgments: the Automatic Shifting of Standards in Brand Evaluations

Brand Stereotypes and Consumer Judgments:

The Automatic Shifting of Standards in Brand Evaluations

 

 

Claudiu V. Dimofte

Georgetown University

 

Johny K. Johansson

Georgetown University

 

 

 

ABSTRACT

            Applying the social psychology precepts of the Shifting Standards Model (Biernat, Manis, and Nelson 1991) it is shown that–depending on a marketer’s particular choice of eliciting consumer feedback–a brand that fares objectively better than another on a specific attribute can in fact be perceived as equal or even relatively worse than the same brand on that very attribute. Such anomalous explicit response originates in consumers’ use of different stereotypical standards for the competing brands. Unless brands are directly juxtaposed (objective judgment), evaluative standards are implicitly more relaxed for the inferior brand, allowing it to match or even surpass its competitor in subjective judgments.



Citation:

Claudiu Dimofte and Johny Johansson (2006) ,"Brand Stereotypes and Consumer Judgments: the Automatic Shifting of Standards in Brand Evaluations", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 312-312.

Authors

Claudiu Dimofte, Georgetown University
Johny Johansson, Georgetown University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



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