Individual Preferences Versus Group Preferences: the Effect of Cultural Orientation on Consumer Receptivity to Customized Offers

INDIVIDUAL PREFERENCES VERSUS GROUP PREFERENCES: THE EFFECT OF CULTURAL ORIENTATION ON CONSUMER RECEPTIVITY TO CUSTOMIZED OFFERS

 

Thomas Kramer, Baruch College / CUNY

Suri Spolter-Weisfeld, Baruch College / CUNY

Maneesh Thakkar, Baruch College / CUNY

 

 

 

Marketing activities increasingly involve customizing products to the individual preferences of customers. However, individual preferences may not be important for product choice for all consumers alike. Providing evidence of the limits of customization, two experiments show that consumers who exhibit interdependent or collectivistic tendencies tend to be more receptive to offers that are not customized to their own individual preferences, but instead to the average preferences of relevant in-groups. However, the interactive effect of cultural orientation and type of marketing approach on receptivity to customized offers is only obtained for products that are consumed in public.



Citation:

Thomas Kramer, Suri Weisfeld-Spolter, and Maneesh Thakkar (2006) ,"Individual Preferences Versus Group Preferences: the Effect of Cultural Orientation on Consumer Receptivity to Customized Offers", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 462-463.

Authors

Thomas Kramer, Baruch College, CUNY
Suri Weisfeld-Spolter, Baruch College, CUNY
Maneesh Thakkar, Baruch College, CUNY



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

The Impact of Implicit Rate of Change on Arousal and Subjective Ratings

James A Mourey, DePaul University, USA
Ryan Elder, Brigham Young University, USA

Read More

Featured

Doing Worse but Feeling Better: Consequences of Collective Choice

Nuno Jose Lopes, University of Navarra
Elena Reutskaja, IESE Business School

Read More

Featured

Dehumanization: Coping with Embarrassment in Consumer Purchases

Yixia Sun, Zhejiang University
Xuehua Wang, East China Normal University
Joey Hoegg, University of British Columbia, Canada
Darren Dahl, University of British Columbia, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.