The Unhealthy = Tasty Intution and Its Effects on Taste Inferences, Enjoyment, and Choice of Food Products

The Unhealthy = Tasty intuItion and its effects on taste inferences, enjoyment, and choice of food products

Rajagopal Raghunathan, The University of Texas at Austin

Rebecca E. Walker, The University of Texas at Austin

Wayne D. Hoyer, The University of Texas at Austin 

 

We find, across three experiments, that when information pertaining to assessing the healthiness of food items is provided, the less healthy the item is portrayed to be: (1) the better its inferred taste, (2) the more it is enjoyed during actual consumption, and (3) the greater the preference for it in choice tasks when a hedonic goal is more salient. These effects are obtained both among consumers who report believing that healthiness and tastiness are negatively correlated and, albeit to a lesser degree, among those who do not report such belief. This suggests that the influence of the assumed negative correlation between healthiness and tastiness can operate outside the consumer’s awareness and, hence, may be difficult to control.



Citation:

Rajagopal Raghunathan, Rebecca Walker, and Wayne Hoyer (2006) ,"The Unhealthy = Tasty Intution and Its Effects on Taste Inferences, Enjoyment, and Choice of Food Products ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 450-451.

Authors

Rajagopal Raghunathan, The University of Texas at Austin
Rebecca Walker, The University of Texas at Austin
Wayne Hoyer, The University of Texas at Austin



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



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