Influences on the Illusory Truth Effect in Consumer Judgment

The Illusory Truth Effect: Exploring Implicit and Explicit

Memory Influences on Consumer Judgments

 

Maria L. Cronley

Miami University

 

Frank R. Kardes

University of Cincinnati

 

Scott A. Hawkins

University of Toronto

 

Repetition does not seem like a sound basis for determining truth, but researchers have consistently found that people rate repeated statements as more true than non-repeated statements.  This effect is known as the illusory truth effect and appears to be quite persistent.  Following on previous work in memory and judgment, additional moderators of attention, exclusion, and subliminal exposure are investigated in two experiments to assess their effects on repetition-induced beliefs of validity for product claims.  Results provide new insights into the processes of incidental learning and implicit memory use by which consumers form judgments based on repetitive persuasive messages.



Citation:

Maria L. Cronley, Frank R. Kardes, and Scott A. Hawkins (2006) ,"Influences on the Illusory Truth Effect in Consumer Judgment ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 247-247.

Authors

Maria L. Cronley, Miami University
Frank R. Kardes, University of Cincinnati
Scott A. Hawkins, University of Toronto



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



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