I Gave At the Office (And I Hated It): Changes in Preference For Ethical Behavior Following an Unrelated Ethical Act

Title:

I Gave at the Office (and I Hated It): Changes in Preference for Ethical Behavior Following an Unrelated Ethical Act

 

Authors:

 

            Jennifer L. Young, University of Texas at Austin

            Julie Irwin, University of Texas at Austin

 

Abstract:

 

Two studies examine propensity to give to a charity following another, unrelated charitable act.  We find that giving is affected both by 1) assimilation of affect from the first charitable act to the second and 2) a newly-identified phenomenon we call “gave at the office”:  respondents sometimes feel that they have done their fair share of charitable giving and lose a sense of obligation to donate to subsequent activities.  Manipulations of difficulty and morality of the first charitable activity determine whether people are likely to experience assimilation or “gave at the office” effects and thus influence people’s likelihood to donate to a second unrelated ethical cause.



Citation:

Jennifer Young and Julie Irwin (2006) ,"I Gave At the Office (And I Hated It): Changes in Preference For Ethical Behavior Following an Unrelated Ethical Act", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 284-284.

Authors

Jennifer Young, University of Texas at Austin
Julie Irwin, University of Texas at Austin



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



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