When I Go Out to Eat I Want to Enjoy Myself: an Investigation Into Consumers' Use of Nutrition Information

WHEN I GO OUT TO EAT I WANT TO ENJOY MYSELF:

AN INVESTIGATION INTO CONSUMERS’ USE OF NUTRITION INFORMATION

 

ABSTRACT

 

Over the past decade, the world has been facing an obesity epidemic.  In the popular press and certain governmental and public policy circles, this seems to be attributed to the marketing efforts of fast-food and chain restaurants.  In two studies models are tested to enlighten the discussion of consumers’ reactions to nutrition information when it is present on restaurant menus.  The results in both studies indicate that when consumers eat out at restaurants their decisions are based on taste and preference rather than nutrition information if it is presented on a menu.  These results may have implications for the proposed legislation of nutrition information on restaurant menus.



Citation:

Courtney Droms (2006) ,"When I Go Out to Eat I Want to Enjoy Myself: an Investigation Into Consumers' Use of Nutrition Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 282-283.

Authors

Courtney Droms, University of South Carolina



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



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