A Halloween Community: the Role of the Marketplace in Response to Social Isolation

A Halloween Community:  The Role of the Marketplace in Response to Social Isolation 

Garth Harris, Queen’s School of Business
There are those that believe that the marketplace is a dull, dehumanizing space void of family, community and creativity (Kozinets, 2002). Yet the marketplace remains an attractive, alluring and even growing dominant logic that many come to actively embrace.  The purpose of this research is to contribute to our understanding of the marketplace by exploring some dimensions underlying the allure of the market.  Using the context of Halloween this paper explores how the amorality of the marketplace, the very thing some consumers are trying to escape actually attracts consumers and provides consumers with an opportunity to temporarily build social bonds.



Citation:

Garth Harris (2006) ,"A Halloween Community: the Role of the Marketplace in Response to Social Isolation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33, eds. Connie Pechmann and Linda Price, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 366-366.

Authors

Garth Harris, Queen's University



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 33 | 2006



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